Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

By 12/10/2022canus

Looking for:

California mule deer size – california mule deer size
Click here to ENTER

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In the spring and summer months a mule deer stag will have softly coated antlers that resemble the gentle texture of velvet. In late summer and early fall, male and female deer will gather for a mating ritual known as the rut , an event where bucks will spar one another for the right to breed with female deer. Being a serial polygamous species, the winners of the rut will gain the right to breed with many does.

Often this ritual is a right of passage and a valuable learning experience for young bucks as they lack the size, experience, and antlers to defeat a larger, more mature buck in battle. For female mule deer, a gestation period lasts on average about days. Fawns are born early spring to mid-summer, and a female doe can give birth to one to three fawn each year. The fawns are spotted at birth but begin to lose their spots as they are weaned from their mother beginning after two and a half months of life.

Does continue to watch after their young for their entire first year of life, but as fawns begin to reach sexual maturity as they reach a year and a half old they will begin to separate from their mother and live on their own.

As herbivores, mule deer feed on a wide variety of plant material with foraging taking place mostly during the hours of dusk and dawn. In the spring and early summer, deer feed on soft mast such as grasses, forbs, and young tender shoots. These highly nutritious leaves contain high amounts of carbohydrates and allow deer to pack on valuable pounds of fat for winter. As autumn approaches, many soft mast food sources dwindle, so mule deer turn to hard mast nut-producing species such as acorns, bark, and buds.

While lower in carbohydrate content, these hard mast items still contain quality fats and proteins that provide a critical source of food for animals during the fall and winter seasons. Acorns are frequently eaten in early winter. As the colder days of fall approach, the bucks frequently choose a sunny spot in the forest for a bed. There, after pawing out any protruding rock or branches, they curl up and go to sleep for a daily sun bath. During the winter I have found that some bucks often seek a bed of dry leaves under a sheltering rock or tree rather than bed down in the snow, although they will take the snow bed if nothing better is available.

In the heat of summer they will choose a cool bed under the shade of some dense pine tree. The most important natural enemies of the California mule deer are the mountain lion, the mountain coyote, and the human hunter.

Both the mountain lion and man seem to exercise a preference for deer in the best physical condition, although there are many humans as well as cougars that take the first available deer. Contrasted to this, it has been my experience that the coyote exercises a selective pruning effect on deer in California in that the majority of deer captured by coyotes are weak, sickly, or diseased individuals, probably because the coyote can more easily capture these.

It should be pointed out that the elimination of such diseased deer may benefit the species by preventing contagion of healthy individuals. Year-round, they feed on acorns; grasses are a secondary food source. Where humans have encroached on historic deer habitat by suburban development or orchards, California mule deer will diversify their diet with garden plant material, with fruit trees, and occasionally, even with pet food.

Fawns and Does tend to forage together in familial groupings while bucks tend to travel singly or with other bucks. California mule deer browse most actively near dawn and dusk, but will also forage at night in open agricultural areas or when experiencing hunting pressure. Rutting mating season occurs in autumn when does come into estrus for a period lasting only several days.

Males manifest aggressive behavior in competing for mates. Does will begin oestrus again if they do not mate. The gestation period is approximately days, with fawns arriving in the spring; the young will remain with mothers throughout the summer and become weaned in the autumn. Mule deer females usually give birth to two fawns, although if it is their first time having a fawn, they often only have one. The several predators other than humans of mule deer include mountain lions. This leading natural predator often select weak, sickly, or young deer to kill, but will also take down the largest and healthiest mule deer with some regularity, as well.

During the rutting, or mating period, bucks spar for females, and become more aggressive as they compete with other bucks for mates. Mule deer are serially polygynous, one buck mates with many does. Gestation period is about days. Does can give birth to one, two, or three fawns, though triplets are rare. Fawns are born in late spring to mid-summer and are spotted at birth but loose their spots within a few months.

Fawns are weaned in the fall after about days and continue to stay with their mothers during the first year. Fawns will become sexually mature at a year and a half. Deer are generally crepuscular, foraging activity occurs mostly around dawn and dusk, but deer may be active day or night depending on other variables, such as human activity or other disturbances in the area.

Deer diets differ across their range, but high quality digestible forage is selected when available. Not all plants are nutritious for deer. Deer feed on grasses and forbs in the spring and summer, however they are primarily browsers.

 
 

Deer – Rancho Ventura

 

These common native mammals play an important role in a variety of local ecosystems. Mule deer can be distinguished from their white-tailed cousins in the eastern U.

There are six subspecies of mule deer found in California. Along the Central Coast, mule deer can be found in a variety of different habitats. They are often seen in oak woodland, conifer forest, chaparral, sagebrush scrub, coastal sage scrub, and recently burned areas. They also forage heavily in grass-dominated areas. Adult mule deer typically weigh between to pounds with a maximum height of 3. A male deer is known as a buck or a stag while a female is known as a doe.

A fawn is a young deer in its first year of life. The number of forks or points on a mule deer is determined mainly by the age of the buck but is also dependent on other factors such as genetics and nutrition.

In the spring and summer months a mule deer stag will have softly coated antlers that resemble the gentle texture of velvet. In late summer and early fall, male and female deer will gather for a mating ritual known as the rut , an event where bucks will spar one another for the right to breed with female deer.

Being a serial polygamous species, the winners of the rut will gain the right to breed with many does. Often this ritual is a right of passage and a valuable learning experience for young bucks as they lack the size, experience, and antlers to defeat a larger, more mature buck in battle.

For female mule deer, a gestation period lasts on average about days. Fawns are born early spring to mid-summer, and a female doe can give birth to one to three fawn each year.

The fawns are spotted at birth but begin to lose their spots as they are weaned from their mother beginning after two and a half months of life. Does continue to watch after their young for their entire first year of life, but as fawns begin to reach sexual maturity as they reach a year and a half old they will begin to separate from their mother and live on their own.

As herbivores, mule deer feed on a wide variety of plant material with foraging taking place mostly during the hours of dusk and dawn. In the spring and early summer, deer feed on soft mast such as grasses, forbs, and young tender shoots.

These highly nutritious leaves contain high amounts of carbohydrates and allow deer to pack on valuable pounds of fat for winter. As autumn approaches, many soft mast food sources dwindle, so mule deer turn to hard mast nut-producing species such as acorns, bark, and buds. While lower in carbohydrate content, these hard mast items still contain quality fats and proteins that provide a critical source of food for animals during the fall and winter seasons.

Mule deer are an important mammalian species in California as they are prey for large predators such as mountain lions and coyotes. The remains of mule deer killed by such predators are important sources of carrion for scavengers such as the endangered California condor. Fortunately, they are not threatened in California. Populations in some areas have shifted due to habitat loss, but generally the number of mule deer in the state is relatively high.

However, populations do wax and wane depending on drought conditions, which can affect food availability. The best time to see this species within the Los Padres National Forest is around dusk or dawn, as this is when they are most active. Because mule deer have eyes that sit on the sides of their head, they are capable of a degree field of view.

They willy typically see you before you see them. Mule deer also have an incredible sense of smell as well, it would be best to avoid using any products that have a strong fragrance including scented laundry detergent before attempting to see a mule deer. Known to be quite skittish, it is best to avoid making a lot of noise when out looking for deer. Keep an eye out for fresh tracks along steep terrain and stay close to fresh water sources to maximize your chances of seeing a mule deer while out on your next adventure within the Los Padres National Forest.

Contact Privacy Policy Site Map. All Rights Reserved. Santa Barbara Wild! Photo by Bryant Baker. Mule deer in coastal sage scrub of the southern Los Padres National Forest. Mule deer in a mixed-conifer forest near Mt. Pinos in the Los Padres National Forest. Mule deer fur at a site where the individual was killed, likely by a mountain lion, in the Los Padres National Forest.

Volunteer We need your help! Join our list of dedicated, fun-loving, adventurous volunteers today. Read more Wild Things Each month, we highlight our region’s unique plants and animals. Click to learn more California Red-legged Frog! Shop Maps, books, and more. Proceeds benefit ForestWatch. Shop now…. English Spanish.

 

California mule deer size – california mule deer size. Mule Deer and Black-tailed Deer Facts

 
Odocoileus hemionus. The most ubiquitous of California’s native cervids (i.e. members the family that include deer, elk, moose, and similar animals), mule. California Mule Deer (O. h. californicus) is found only in California, ranging roughly from the Sierra Nevada mountains west to the Pacific Ocean. Along the. › online_books › pwro › wildlife_portfolio › mammal